Friday, December 19, 2014

Two year-end movies to warm your heart

Source: The Korea.net


The year end is just around the corner. Two recently released heart-wrenching movies are being recommended for the season. The two movies share one thing in common, that both are documentaries based on the daily lives of real people.

The first is "My Love, Don't Cross That River," a story revolving around an old couple that has been together for as long as 76 years. The other is "The Hospice (목숨)." It deals with patients in a hospice preparing for their final moments in life. It's long been believed in both the box office and among movie-goers that documentaries can rarely succeed. These two films, however, have broken those perceptions and are on a steady rise.

"My Love, Don't Cross That River" tells the story of an old couple who have loved each other for their whole lives. The protagonists are husband Jo Byung-man, 98, and wife Kang Kye-yeol, 89. Wherever they go, the couple wears Hanbok in matching colors and walks with hands tightly clasped.

141219_korea_movie_2.jpg


141219_korea_movie_1.jpg


"My Love, Don't Cross That River" shows the romantic daily lives of an old couple.

In the spring, the couple picks beautiful flowers together and pins them in each other's hair. They play with the water in the streams in the summer and in the fall, enjoy the autumn foliage together, even throwing leaves at each other. In the winter, they make snowmen together.

With the passage of time and age, Jo becomes increasingly weak and separation draws near. "I really wish I could go with you," the wife cries in the movie, bringing tears to viewers' eyes.

141219_korea_movie_4.jpg


"The Hospice" shows the lives of patients and their families at a hospice. It's sad, yet heart-warming.

"The Hospice" tells the story of patients at a hospice who, on average, have 21 days left to live. They are all a special someone to their fathers, mothers, spouses or children. The movie pictures the final moments of the patients in their deathbeds, a time that nobody can avoid, moving the hearts of viewers.

The message that the two movies both pursue is the true meaning of life. It reminds us of things that we have forgotten, but which were never meant to be.

Director Jin Mo-yeong of "My Love, Don't Cross That River" said, "It seems that people of all ages and sexes have sympathy for the love story of the old couple. They've recommended the movie to their parents and family, drawing even bigger audiences."

Director Lee Chang-jae of "The Hospice" said, "Thinking about death and having only 21 days left to live is both sad and scary. However, the movie shows happiness and love as much as it scares you. This movie will give you the time to turn your eyes to things that you have missed out on for some time, such as the preciousness of yourself, your family and your acquaintances."

Both movies bring you to the intersection of life and death, encouraging you to think about "how to live."

Major theaters across the country will be screening both documentaries.

Joseon royal food returns to Seoul

Royal Joseon cuisine. as seen in the hit soap opera "Jewel in the Palace," has now made a comeback in Seoul.

An event to bring back the original form of Korean cuisine and cooking as enjoyed in the royal Joseon palaces, and aimed at developing various new menu items based on the royal traditions, was held at the Samcheonggak, a restaurant in Samcheong-dong in northern Seoul on December 15. For the "Royal Set Menu by Daejanggeum" event, the Institute of Korean Royal Cuisine demonstrated eight different dishes, out of a possible 70, which it has been cataloguing to make them more accessible to the general public.

 An event to bring back royal cuisine is held at the Samcheonggak, a traditional restaurant in northern Seoul, on December 15.
An event to bring back royal cuisine is held at the Samcheonggak, a traditional restaurant in northern Seoul, on December 15.


Han Bok-ryeo, president of the Institute of Korean Royal Cuisine, gives a royal Joseon cooking demonstration, as chefs and journalists look on.
Han Bok-ryeo, president of the Institute of Korean Royal Cuisine, gives a royal Joseon cooking demonstration, as chefs and journalists look on.


The institute introduced a set menu for six people that was based on food seen in the drama. Some 40 chefs and journalists attended the event, watching how the set menu was organized and enjoying the food afterward.

The institute intends to publish a cook book, "Royal Set Menu by Daejanggeum," next year and distributed two sample chapters of the book in both Korean and English at the event. The book introduces the history and values related to royal cuisine and explains how to cook the food in an easy way so that beginner chefs can actually follow the instructions and cook the food at home.

The book contains 70 different recipes for royal dishes accompanied by an explanation of the philosophy behind the food and any stories related to the dish. Pictures from the TV show "Jewel in the Palace" are also found throughout the book.

 Soft persimmon is mixed with bamboo shoots.
Soft persimmon is mixed with bamboo shoots.


 Milk porridge
Milk porridge


 (From top, clockwise) Braised short beef ribs, kimchi, noodles in radish and pear water kimchi broth.
(From top, clockwise) Braised short beef ribs, kimchi, noodles in radish and pear water kimchi broth.

Citron fruit salad (right), a sweet traditional cookie.
Citron fruit salad (right), a sweet traditional cookie.


"Culinary tradition is a medium that introduces a country's identity, history and values," said Kang Min-su, chairman of the Korean Food Foundation. "We will continue with our various projects, including the revival of the original form of Korean food."

By Limb Jae-un
Korea.net Staff Writer
Photos courtesy of Korean Food Foundation
jun2@korea.kr

 An exhibit of the set menu prepared by the Institute of Korean Royal Cuisine.
An exhibit of the set menu prepared by the Institute of Korean Royal Cuisine.
 
Source: Korea.net
 
 

Korea, China to study 'comfort women' issue

Korea and China have embarked on a joint study of the "comfort women" issue.

On December 15, the Northeast Asian History Foundation signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Jilin Province Archives to conduct research into the issue of the comfort women, people who were forced into sexual slavery by the Imperial Japanese Army up until the 1940s. Their aim is to investigate the historical facts.

Hong Myeon-ki (right), a senior official at the Northeast Asian History Foundation, and Yin Huai, director of the Jilin Province Archives, sign an MOU to pursue a joint study into the 'comfort women' issue.
Hong Myeon-ki (right), a senior official at the Northeast Asian History Foundation, and Yin Huai, director of the Jilin Province Archives, sign an MOU to pursue a joint study into the 'comfort women' issue.


The Jilin Province Archives is responsible for storing official documents and has many records related to Japanese aggression. Officials at the foundation visited the archives in June and browsed through some of the documents on file there. In return, in August researchers at the archives came to Korea and jointly studied the documents kept at the National Archives of Korea. This is a follow-up measure after Korea and China agreed in July to cooperate on related issues, including a joint study into comfort women-related materials and the exchange of documents.

The two sides recognized the fact that the victimization of the sexual slaves is a violation of the women's rights and is also a universal human rights issue. They agreed to establish long-term, stable research together into the subject.

Researchers from the Northeast Asian History Foundation and the Jilin Province Archives discuss a joint study into sexual slavery during Japanese colonial times.
Researchers from the Northeast Asian History Foundation and the Jilin Province Archives discuss a joint study into sexual slavery during Japanese colonial times.


The foundation also donated a book of testimony given by surviving victims, while the archives donated copies of 25 materials containing evidence related to their captivity, among other things.

The two institutions also decided to continue their joint study and sharing of documents, and to allow each other to browse and copy related material. They also agreed to invite researchers to conduct further studies and to talk more about holding a joint seminar next year.

By Limb Jae-un
Korea.net Staff Writer
Photos courtesy of the Northeast Asian History Foundation
jun2@korea.kr

Courtesy : Korea.net

 
There was an error in this gadget